Depression in the Primary Care: Findings from the National Research Programme BIOMEDICINA 2014-2017

ABSTRACT SL5-1

ELMARS RANCANS
Riga Stradins University, Department of Psychiatry and Narcology, Riga, Latvia

JELENA VRUBLEVSKA
Riga Stradins University, Department of Psychiatry and Narcology, Riga, Latvia

ROLANDS IVANOVS
Riga Stradins University, Department of Psychiatry and Narcology, Riga, Latvia

ANDA KIVITE
Riga Stradins University, Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, Riga, Latvia

ABSTRACT DESCRIPTION

Worldwide the prevalence of depressive disorders in primary care has been estimated to be between 10-20%, but there are sparse studies from Eastern Europe. Recent study found 12-month prevalence of 7.9% of major depression in the general population of Latvia, but the Latvian National data arrays show that general practitioners (GP’s) diagnosed only 4634 unique patients with a diagnosis of mood disorder in 2015.

During one week all patients aged 18+ who visited GP for medical reasons at 24 primary care facilities all over the country, were invited to participate in the study. Study subjects were interviewed with structured sociodemographic questionnaire. The MINI (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview) was conducted over the telephone by psychiatrist not more than 2 weeks after visit to GP.

Out of total 1585 consenting patients, 1485 were interviewed with the MINI. According to MINI 10.2% (8.7-11.8; here and further 95% confidence intervals) had current and 28.1% (25.9-30.4) had lifetime depression. Odds ratio (OR) adjusted by all sociodemographic factors for current and lifetime depression was higher in women, 1.92 (1.22-3.00, p=0.005) and 1.97 (1.49-2.62, p<0.001), respectively. Education lower vs. higher than secondary had 1.97 (1.11-3.47, p=0.02) times odds of current depression. Higher odds both for current and lifetime depression were identified for respondents who are divorced or live separated, 1.83 (1.25-2.69, p=0.002) and 1.76 (1.35-2.29, p<0.001). Gastroenterological diseases as a reason to visit GP had the highest OR for both prevalences, 3.14 (1.69-5.83, p<0.001) and 1.76 (1.35-2.29, p<0.001). Being absent at work 15 days and more during last 3 months was associated with 2.32 (1.28-4.21, p=0.006) times higher odds for current depression compare to those who did not have absent days at work.

Prevalence of depression in primary care is in line with other European studies. Certain factors are associated with higher odds of morbidity with depression.