Measuring the System of Mental Health Care: Towards Better Surveillance Frameworks

ABSTRACT SZ15-5

EGLE SUMSKIENE
Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania

DONATA PETRUZYTE
Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania

LIUBOVE MURAUSKIENE
Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania

JURGA DIRZIENE
Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania

VAIVA KLIMAITE
Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania

ARUNAS GERMANAVICIUS
Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania

ABSTRACT DESCRIPTION

The aim of this paper is to present an ongoing research project „Paradigm Change of Mental Health and Well-being in Lithuania: Towards Empirically Valid Model” (granted by Research Council of Lithuania) and part of its very first results.

According to the MH Action Plan 2013-2020, information, evidence and research are critical ingredients for appropriate mental health policy, planning and evaluation. The generation of new knowledge through research enables policies and actions to be based on evidence, and the availability of timely and relevant surveillance frameworks enables implemented actions to be monitored and improvements in service provision to be detected.

Mental health indicators currently in use in Lithuania include type and number of healthcare facilities, diagnosis of people using psychiatric facilities, numbers of mental health professionals, and suicide rates. Nevertheless, these mental health indicators do not capture the broad spectrum of interrelated public mental health problems and absence of interdisciplinary approach that characterizes this field.

Without an effective surveillance system it is not possible to identify the priorities, allocate mental health resources, monitor the effectiveness of new policies, and assess the success of pilot projects.

Thus this project is aimed to foster reflection, evaluative culture of the mental health system, provide scientific research and evaluation of efficacy of pharmaceutic and psychotherapeutic treatment to psychological and social functioning, and to estimate economic burden of treatment and mental diseases that society must pay.

This paper will present a newly developed and piloted model, which is based on social, psychological and economical measurements and rates.