PS39: PREVALENCE OF BURNOUT SYNDROME AMONG MEDICAL STAFF. A LINK BETWEEN BURNOUT SYNDROME AND PERSONAL RESILIENCE

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AUTHORS
Aušra Senkuvienė1, Renata Žakauskė2, Aušra Lapytė3, Augustinas Žemaitis4, Gabrielė Beinoraitė4, Rima Viliūnienė5, Eugenijus Laurinaitis5, Alvydas Navickas5

1Centro Outpatient Clinic, Day Care Unit, Vilnius, Lithuania
2Vilnius University Hospital Santariskiu Klinikos, Department of Psychiatry, Vilnius, Lithuania
3Cliniques universitaires de Bruxelles-Université libre de Bruxelles Hôpital Erasme, Brussels, Belgium
4Vilnius University Medical Faculty, Vilnius, Lithuania
5Vilnius University Medical Faculty Psychiatric Clinic, Vilnius, Lithuania

ABSTRACT DESCRIPTION

Introduction: Burnout syndrome is a long term reaction to the influence of factors causing chronic emotional stress. It is composed of three aspects: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and diminished satisfaction with personal accomplishments. Personal resilience is a capability to use one’s inner resources to find functional solutions in adverse circumstances.

Respondents and research methods: A questionnaire-based (demographical questions, Maslach Burnout Inventory – Human Services Survey and Resilience Scale for Adults) survey of 272 doctors and 117 nurses was performed between December, 2013 and April, 2016 in Tauragė and Jurbarkas hospitals, their consulting clinics, Vilnius University Hospital Santariskiu Klinikos, Republican Vilnius University Hospital, Clinical Hospital of Vilnius, the National Cancer Institute and Centro Polyclinic in Lithuania.

Results: Among survey participants, majority – 298 (76.6%) – were women; 280 (72.0%) persons held university higher education; 325 (84.0%) lived not alone. Levels of burnout syndrome in MBI scales of emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishments were respectively: high: 117 (30.1%), 172 (44.2%), 106 (27.2%); medium: 139 (35.7%), 89 (22.9%), 103 (26.5%); low: 133 (34.2%), 128 (32.9%), 180 (46.3%) p < 0.05. Men, persons with university higher education and those working in their current position for less than 9 years were more prone to burnout: respectively 41%; 37% and 42%, p < 0.05. A higher level of burnout syndrome was more frequent among doctors (38%) rather than nurses (11%), p < 0.05. The mean of personal resilience was 169.4 points ±25.1. A reverse relation between psychological resilience and severity of burnout was determined, p < 0.05.

Conclusions: A high level of burnout syndrome was more common in men, staff members below 40 years of age, those working in their current position for less than 9 years and those with university higher education. Signs of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation dominate. Symptoms of burnout are less frequent when psychological resilience is higher.

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