PS55: RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE USE OF BENZODIAZEPINES AND COGNITIVE FUNCTIONS IMPAIRMENT IN THE ELDERLY

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AUTHORS

Algirdas Dambrava1, Kristina Steponavičiūtė1, Dovilė Pauraitė1

1Vilnius University Medical Faculty, Vilnius, Lithuania

ABSTRACT DESCRIPTION

Introduction: Benzodiazepines are frequently prescribed to the patients with various psychiatric disorders. Some studies suggest, that benzodiazepines have effect on cognition and their long-term use can be associated with cognitive decline. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of benzodiazepines use on cognitive functions.

Materials and methods: 124 patients were interviewed with the age of seventy years and older, who, at some point from October 2016 till January 2017, were treated in Vilnius city clinical hospital’s Internal Medicine, Cardiology and Nephrology departments. Patients were asked about their use of benzodiazepines including the duration and reasons for use. Their cognitive state was examined by using Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) with the following interpretation: 0-10 – severe cognitive impairment, 11-19 – moderate cognitive impairment, 20-24 – mild cognitive impairment, >25 – no cognitive impairment.

Results: 81 (65.3%) woman and 43 (34.7%) men were interviewed. The mean age was 79.07 ± 6.3 years. 62.1% (77) have used benzodiazepines – 67.9% (55) from interviewed woman and 51.2% (22) from interviewed men. 20.8% (16) have used lorazepam, 19.5% (15)-clonazepam, 28.5% (22) – bromazepam, 10.4% (8) – alprazolam, 20.8% (16) – diazepam. 37% (28) have used benzodiazepines because of anxiety disorders, 33% (25) – sleeping disorders, 30% (23) – anxiety and sleeping disorders. 18.2% (14) used benzodiazepines episodically, 9.1% (7) – less than 6 weeks, 26% (20) -1-5 years, 24.7% (19) – more than 5 years. From those who have used benzodiazepines 58.4% (45) had no cognitive impairment, 19.5% (15) had mild, 19.5% (15) had moderate and 2.6% (2) had severe cognitive impairment (comparing with those who haven’t used benzodiazepines – 91.5% (43) had no cognitive impairment, 8.5% (4) had mild cognitive impairment, no one had moderate or severe cognitive impairment (p = 0.001).

Conclusion: Patients who have ever used benzodiazepines statistically significant more often had cognitive impairment comparing with those who haven’t used benzodiazepines.

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